• About the exhibition
  • Scope Basel

    • Artists of the exhibition 
    • Peter Demetz

      Peter Demetz' light wood carved works are snapshots of everyday situations, without describing stories or actions. The stage-like embedding of the protagonists in display cases creates timeless silence and contrasting sensations of infinity and freedom versus determinism and social constraint. The scenes are composed of distance and proximity of the figures and of the architectural elements. The viewer is invited to ascribe to the artist's figures emotions and thoughts as well es to their settings past and future.

      Angela Glajcar

      Angela Glajcar's paper sculptures mostly hang, floating in the air. They seem light and delicate, however they show a strong sculptural presence. Terforation is the title of Angela Glajcar's cubic pieces. The staggered arrangement of the vertically hung series of sheets of white paper, with torn edges, produces cave-like recessions. These extend into the depth of the sculpture. The sharp ridges and deep caverns evoke associations with glacial or rock formations while light and shadow fall on the surface of the sheets, enlivening the interior of the oblong structure. The viewer is led into fascinating rooms of harmony and silence.

      Antonio Marra

      Antonio Marra’s abstract works remain truly fascinating due to their surprising change of form and colour. Each of his multi-perspective paintings contains several more pictures which reveal themselves by circling around the canvas. Step by step the spectator is drawn into a vivid and dynamic kaleidoscope of shape and colour. Marra’s art is a surprising experience of unique visual and dimensional effects. This painter has come to his very own style reflecting and redefining the techniques of Op-art and Orphism.

      Yoshiyuki Miura

      Yoshiyuki Miura’s works may be considered a systematizing regulation to the omnipresent chaos. With his sculptures and installations the Japanese artist reflects the relation of space and time. He leads force and counterforce in order to bring them into balanced state of tension and release. Miura creates objects which play with our perception of three-dimensionality and intrigue us by their extraordinary simplicity, precision and beauty.

      Salustiano

      The main theme of Spanish artist Salustiano is the portrait. Highly aesthetically, the artist plays with the viewer's eye which he opposes and exposes the fascinating impenetrable glances of the characters he portrayes. Often in about 60 layers of paint he is carving out the facial features of his partly androgynous protagonists acting in finest precision. These are always placed against a plain or white background and seem – devoting themselves in almost manic peculiarity to mental or physical actions - isolated from the outside world. The intellectual immersion or instinctive decisiveness and power of the portrayed persons, wether they are delicate, young girls or boys, is strongly noticeable.

      Moto Waganari

      Moto Waganari creates transparent network-sculptures which outline a delicate body frame. By illuminating his sculptures the artists multiplies his three dimensional objects by a two dimensional shadow revealing the immaterial alter ego of every figure. His characters seem to visualize a surreal, parallel world filled with surprise and enigma. Moto Waganari’s sculptures seduce the spectator with their appealing beauty and sophisticated weightlessness.

      Aldo Cristofaro

      Aldo Cristofaro considers himself “a collector of his visible and audible surroundings”. Strolling through the modern metropolis he is inspired by patterns on the street or graffiti art on the walls. His abstract works transfer musical sounds and visual impressions of modern city life into painting. Cristofaro’s energetic and intensely colourful compositions convey vigour, ardour and set the imagination free. The Sicilian born artist lives and works in Berlin.

      Marco Casentini

      Marco Casentini explores in his work spatial dynamics of color, texture and shape. He is inspired by designs of urban space and reflects geometrical and architectural questions. By decoding environments and urban structures that he perceives immediately, he deconstructs and interprets designs of architects, engineers and town planners. Casentinis use of radiant, bright or strong colors is stimulated by southern Californian or Mexican paintings of houses and dematerializes their architectural surfaces.