• HIGHLIGHTS
  • About the exhibition
  • HIGHLIGHTS

    • Artists of the exhibition 
    • Angela Glajcar

      Angela Glajcar's paper sculptures mostly hang, floating in the air. They seem light and delicate, however they show a strong sculptural presence. Terforation is the title of Angela Glajcar's cubic pieces. The staggered arrangement of the vertically hung series of sheets of white paper, with torn edges, produces cave-like recessions. These extend into the depth of the sculpture. The sharp ridges and deep caverns evoke associations with glacial or rock formations while light and shadow fall on the surface of the sheets, enlivening the interior of the oblong structure. The viewer is led into fascinating rooms of harmony and silence.

      Dirk Salz

      Dirk Salz works on paintings whose most striking feature is their high-gloss surfaces. These are the result of the use of multi-layered epoxy resins coated with pigments and the sealing with polyurethane varnish. The images of Dirk Salz always aim at the experience of the temporality of the seeing. They demand an active viewer, who takes the time to move back and forth, back and forth, before the initially closing works, in order to open up their complexity so slowly. Reflection in this work is thus in two forms in the game: optically as the mirroring property of the picture surfaces, as a reflection-aesthetic as the reflection of the viewer on his own visual experience.

      Antonio Marra

      Antonio Marra’s abstract works remain truly fascinating due to their surprising change of form and colour. Each of his multi-perspective paintings contains several more pictures which reveal themselves by circling around the canvas. Step by step the spectator is drawn into a vivid and dynamic kaleidoscope of shape and colour. Marra’s art is a surprising experience of unique visual and dimensional effects. This painter has come to his very own style reflecting and redefining the techniques of Op-art and Orphism.

      Yoshiyuki Miura

      Yoshiyuki Miura’s works may be considered a systematizing regulation to the omnipresent chaos. With his sculptures and installations the Japanese artist reflects the relation of space and time. He leads force and counterforce in order to bring them into balanced state of tension and release. Miura creates objects which play with our perception of three-dimensionality and intrigue us by their extraordinary simplicity, precision and beauty.

      Rudolf Burda

      Rudolf Burda was born on 29.05.1973 in the industrial city of Mladá Boleslav in the center of Europe, in the Czech Republic. During the years 1987 -1991 Rudolf Burda studied at the School of Applied Arts in Turnov (Czech Republic) major of artistic blacksmithing. In 1992 until 1993 he was interned in California, USA, and then founded his art studio back in the Czech Republic. In 2010, he was fascinated by glass and since then is professionally engaged in the creation of glass objects and sculptures.Nowadays he primarily works with glass, but, also, often produces wonderful objects made of glass and stainless steel. His works are found in various art collections in the Czech Republic, Germany, Austria, Holland, London, United States of America, and the Middle East. In 2012 participated in a big exhibition at Utrecht, Netherlands, twice in 2014 and 2015 exhibited in Dubai, UAE. In April 2016 Rolls-Royce bought a whole collection of RR & RB. The chairman of Leica Company had personally contacted Rudolf and asked him to create a 5-meters-high work for brand new Leica World in Wetzlar, Germany. In the end of this year Rudolf Burda is looking forward to participate in the most prestigious art events for emerging artists: The Jiangsu Art Fair and the Scope Miami Art Basel Miami, which will be followed by a personal large exhibition in the capital of Oman Muscat.
      Rudolf says about his own creativity following words:
      “The greatest inspiration for me is the universe that is fulfilling my life’s credo of being the energy of the big bang, which has neither beginning nor ending. In my creativity, I’m following minimalistic legacy and I am searching for the ideal and pure form, which is perceived as “gestalt” – “an organized whole”. My aim is to contribute to the preservation of the old tradition of hand-blown glass together with developing and perfecting it.

      I hope to evoke in a viewer understanding of time and space, formed from a continuous flow of energy, which reflects all reality but at the same time, it creates and it swallows. In my works, I preserve the old tradition of hand-blown glass and on the other side, I am aimed to represent a new concept of layered glass and unique aesthetics of material”.

      Roland Helmer

      Since the 60s, Roland Helmer develops his constructive and concrete work with the utmost consequence. His abstract-geometric early work shows clear forms, quiet areas and is limited to a maximum of 7 or 8 bright colors. The variety of shapes is reduced in later work on narrow and wide lines in a vertical and horizontal screen layout. The color palette expands on certain issues by blends and underpainting with white and black. In painting concrete and constructive, he is one of those designers who bring a personal picture as part of an imaging system.

      Jim Avignon

      All-round artist Jim Avignon is internationally renowned as a painter, musician, performance-artist and writer. His naive cartoon style is deceiving - with a touch of irony he questions our capitalistic globalised world. His fast and low priced mass production sabotages the strategies of the art market and disapproves of financial speculation. Although Avignon is long since considered an iconic figure in the Berlin art- and music scene he still manages to cross the boundaries of mainstream and underground.

      Jessus Hernandez

      Jessus Hernandez lives and works in Southern California. He is a self-taught artist drawing inspiration from the diversity that abounds. Architecture and nature converge in his creations where he infuses vibrant color, linear form, dimension, light, and space to create geometric abstract art forms in a vast array of superimposed perspectives. Always intrigued with the placement of shapes and lines in cityscapes, he developed a love for architectural design which became the foundation for his artistic visions.

      Bas Meeuws

      Bas Meeuws is a young photographer who is injecting the traditional Dutch genre of the flower piece with new élan. He composes his work the way the old masters did, flower by flower in luxury and splendour. The result is a layered photography that transcends time. In the area of digital photography he is a self-taught all-rounder and proficient in documentation, portraiture, nature and children. It is only in flower pieces, however, that his interests coalesce: beauty, nature, the technical challenge, meaning and art. His work is closely allied to the history and traditions of art because it is explicitly based on the still lifes of the seventeenth century. With all their polished digital beauty, the photos evoke the glory of the Dutch Golden Age.

      Danielle van Zadelhoff

      Danielle van Zadelhoff was born in Amsterdam, Holland. Now she lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium.
      In 2013 she purchased her first camera and from that moment she became obsessed with photography. The combination of photography and her education and fascination with the human psyche gives her photos a tension that leaves no one untouched. Danielle says: “I am inspired by the big themes in life, loneliness, vulnerability, the raw pure emotions in daily life. I want to capture this in the image, something that is almost invisible, but always present.” There are also a couple of images where religion comes to the surface. “I was raised in a Protestant school with a Catholic grandmother and a humanistic father. Religion is so integrated in our society and it is also a big theme in the seventeenth century painting.” It brings us to her background of restoring historical atmosphere. In her images this becomes visible through the sophisticated touch and finesse of her work and the attention to detail and proportions. Characteristic for Danielle’s work is the frequent use of Claire-obscure, a technique that was popular among the painters in the Renaissance period.

      Henning von Gierke

      The well-renowned Munich based artist Henning von Gierke has long since caught the attention of an international audience which has been intrigued by his realistic painting. In his works von Gierke questions our existence in the context of nature, religion and philosophy. His rich oeuvre consists of classic topics deriving from Greek mythology and Christianity just like portraits, still lifes or interiors. Not only as a painter but also as an opera-director and stage designer von Gierke is much asked for. For his film settings he has been awarded the highly respected „Deutscher Filmpreis“ in Gold and the „Silberner Bär“.

      Slava Seidel

      The magical compositions by the Russian painter Slava Seidel visualize a world shifting between truth and illusion. Her sepia-ink drawings depict surreal scenes in stupendous architectural settings which create a feeling of tension, vertigo and dynamic. The artist masters to depict even the most complex architectural structures in contortion - despite the challenging ink-technique which does not allow any later corrections. Seidel’s technical precision is just as remarkable as her imaginary gift which takes us to unknown, fantastic realities.

      Moto Waganari

      Moto Waganari creates transparent network-sculptures which outline a delicate body frame. By illuminating his sculptures the artists multiplies his three dimensional objects by a two dimensional shadow revealing the immaterial alter ego of every figure. His characters seem to visualize a surreal, parallel world filled with surprise and enigma. Moto Waganari’s sculptures seduce the spectator with their appealing beauty and sophisticated weightlessness.

      Christiane Grimm

      Christiane Grimm creates objects with different layers of glass and other materials which are arranged in such a manner, that the incoming light creates an almost holographic effect. Grimm experiments with the potential of color and with the brightening in subtle transitions. They are poetic constructs and illusionistic architectures out of clear, seemingly floating plains – achromatic and chromatic. The arrangement of the different elements makes it hardly possible to locate them perspectively within space. Moreover there are irritating optical effects which make it even more difficult to grasp Grimm's artworks which can be located somewhere between painting, sculpture and architecture.

      Udo Nöger

      Udo Nöger attended Fachhochschule, Bielefeld University, and has studied in Paderborn, Berlin and Spain. Thanks to winning Nixdorf Grant, he spent some time in the early 90’s in New York, NY and Denver, CO.

      Nöger aims to bring out the luminescence of paint in his practice. The artist is known for monochromatic gray works that give the impression of emitting light. Nöger achieves this effect by stretching multiple pieces of fabric or canvas onto one frame; he either paints on or cuts shapes into the different layers beforehand. As a result, the work appears lighter and more transparent in certain parts. Nöger has also been known to paint on the underside of the fabric, and to use materials of varying thickness and opacity.

      Udo Nöger’s paintings, which appear at first glance to be gestural Abstract Expressionism transmuted to a subtle, luminous palette of pale silvery grays, whites and off-whites, change as the viewer moves in and out or changes the angle of view, as well as the level and quality of light falling on and reflected back from the works. The scumbled surfaces and tubular forms (which look airbrushed, but are not) change in sharpness (and thus implied depth) and even color. The wall color may be visible, and possibly also the floor; it’s difficult to decipher how these works operate. With their abstract illusionism perfectly calibrated, they’re spatially ambiguous.

      Lucas Blok

      Lucas Blok's paintings emanate and pulse with a quiet complexity. One first sees the vivid color fields arranged in geometric tautness, then the subtleties in color and shape begin their work. The pristine surfaces of Blok's paintings vibrate: dominant shapes seem to dematerialize; color chords register their optical strength; phantom colors migrate or surge across the picture plane. The artist ushers the viewer into a world of color relationships that play on optical nerves and emotions alike. Adjacent color areas harmonize or generate delicate discords that become, like musical compositions, harmony, rhythm, discord, balance.

      Medardus

      Medardus developes his painting cycles by searching for clues in the past. For his oil paintings the artist combines motives of historical paintings or photographs with his own picture imaginations and creatures as well as with contemporary topics such as technology or aerospace. Medardus creates ambivalent, strange visual spaces, in which humans, animals and machines merge to timeless views. The artist lives and works in Switzerland.

      Herbert Mehler

      Herbert Mehler’s steel sculptures embody archaic shapes from nature and geometry which may be associated with organic forms of plants and buds. „I am convinced that everyone of us has incorporated a set of basic patterns which affect the human perception.“ The sculptor intertwines organic and tectonic principles - the folded surfaces of his objects remind us of tree bark as well as classical Greek columns. Mehler’s curvelinear objects bend and turn suggesting energetic impetus as a metaphor for organic growth and vitality.

Artworks of the exhibition

With works by Angela Glajcar, Dirk Salz, Antonio Marra, Yoshiyuki Miura, Rudolf Burda, Roland Helmer, Jim Avignon, Jessus Hernandez, Bas Meeuws, Danielle van Zadelhoff, Henning von Gierke, Slava Seidel, Moto Waganari, Christiane Grimm, Udo Nöger, Lucas Blok, Medardus, Herbert Mehler