• About the exhibition
  • Art Pampelonne

    • Artists of the exhibition 
    • Marco Casentini

      Marco Casentini explores in his work spatial dynamics of color, texture and shape. He is inspired by designs of urban space and reflects geometrical and architectural questions. By decoding environments and urban structures that he perceives immediately, he deconstructs and interprets designs of architects, engineers and town planners. Casentinis use of radiant, bright or strong colors is stimulated by southern Californian or Mexican paintings of houses and dematerializes their architectural surfaces.

      Christiane Grimm

      Christiane Grimm creates objects with different layers of glass and other materials which are arranged in such a manner, that the incoming light creates an almost holographic effect. Grimm experiments with the potential of color and with the brightening in subtle transitions. They are poetic constructs and illusionistic architectures out of clear, seemingly floating plains – achromatic and chromatic. The arrangement of the different elements makes it hardly possible to locate them perspectively within space. Moreover there are irritating optical effects which make it even more difficult to grasp Grimm's artworks which can be located somewhere between painting, sculpture and architecture.

      Lucas Blok

      Lucas Blok's paintings emanate and pulse with a quiet complexity. One first sees the vivid color fields arranged in geometric tautness, then the subtleties in color and shape begin their work. The pristine surfaces of Blok's paintings vibrate: dominant shapes seem to dematerialize; color chords register their optical strength; phantom colors migrate or surge across the picture plane. The artist ushers the viewer into a world of color relationships that play on optical nerves and emotions alike. Adjacent color areas harmonize or generate delicate discords that become, like musical compositions, harmony, rhythm, discord, balance.

      Roland Helmer

      Since the 60s, Roland Helmer develops his constructive and concrete work with the utmost consequence. His abstract-geometric early work shows clear forms, quiet areas and is limited to a maximum of 7 or 8 bright colors. The variety of shapes is reduced in later work on narrow and wide lines in a vertical and horizontal screen layout. The color palette expands on certain issues by blends and underpainting with white and black. In painting concrete and constructive, he is one of those designers who bring a personal picture as part of an imaging system.

      Marcus Jansen

      Marcus Jansen is regarded as the inventor and pioneer of a new urban form of Expressionism. Jansen earned a reputation in the 1980s on the New York’s graffiti scene, where he met WEST ONE. Raised bilingually by his German father and his West Indian mother, Jansen went to a public school in Germany. In the late 1990s he developed his distinctive neo-expressionistic “Crossover” style, which references components of German Expressionism and Robert Rauschenberg’s “Combine Paintings.” Underlying themes in Jansen’s paintings include the traumata of the Gulf War, in which he served as a GI, and the desolate environment, which is not only beset by natural disasters, but also suffers from helpless humankind’s exposure to epochal upheavals such as 9/11 and the real estate bubble.

      Moto Waganari

      Lutz Wagner aka Moto Waganari creates transparent network-sculptures which outline a delicate body frame. By illuminating his sculptures the artists multiplies his three dimensional objects by a two dimensional shadow revealing the immaterial alter ego of every figure. His characters seem to visualize a surreal, parallel world filled with surprise and enigma. Moto Waganari’s sculptures seduce the spectator with their appealing beauty and sophisticated weightlessness.

      Yoshiyuki Miura

      Yoshiyuki Miura’s works may be considered a systematizing regulation to the omnipresent chaos. With his sculptures and installations the Japanese artist reflects the relation of space and time. He leads force and counterforce in order to bring them into balanced state of tension and release. Miura creates objects which play with our perception of three-dimensionality and intrigue us by their extraordinary simplicity, precision and beauty.

      Antonio Marra

      Antonio Marra’s abstract works remain truly fascinating due to their surprising change of form and colour. Each of his multi-perspective paintings contains several more pictures which reveal themselves by circling around the canvas. Step by step the spectator is drawn into a vivid and dynamic kaleidoscope of shape and colour. Marra’s art is a surprising experience of unique visual and dimensional effects. This painter has come to his very own style reflecting and redefining the techniques of Op-art and Orphism.

      Dirk Salz

      Dirk Salz works on paintings whose most striking feature is their high-gloss surfaces. These are the result of the use of multi-layered epoxy resins coated with pigments and the sealing with polyurethane varnish. The images of Dirk Salz always aim at the experience of the temporality of the seeing. They demand an active viewer, who takes the time to move back and forth, back and forth, before the initially closing works, in order to open up their complexity so slowly. Reflection in this work is thus in two forms in the game: optically as the mirroring property of the picture surfaces, as a reflection-aesthetic as the reflection of the viewer on his own visual experience.

      Slava Seidel

      The magical compositions by the Russian painter Slava Seidel visualize a world shifting between truth and illusion. Her sepia-ink drawings depict surreal scenes in stupendous architectural settings which create a feeling of tension, vertigo and dynamic. The artist masters to depict even the most complex architectural structures in contortion - despite the challenging ink-technique which does not allow any later corrections. Seidel’s technical precision is just as remarkable as her imaginary gift which takes us to unknown, fantastic realities.

      Angela Glajcar

      Angela Glajcar's paper sculptures mostly hang, floating in the air. They seem light and delicate, however they show a strong sculptural presence. Terforation is the title of Angela Glajcar's cubic pieces. The staggered arrangement of the vertically hung series of sheets of white paper, with torn edges, produces cave-like recessions. These extend into the depth of the sculpture. The sharp ridges and deep caverns evoke associations with glacial or rock formations while light and shadow fall on the surface of the sheets, enlivening the interior of the oblong structure. The viewer is led into fascinating rooms of harmony and silence.

      Herbert Mehler

      Herbert Mehler’s steel sculptures embody archaic shapes from nature and geometry which may be associated with organic forms of plants and buds. „I am convinced that everyone of us has incorporated a set of basic patterns which affect the human perception.“ The sculptor intertwines organic and tectonic principles - the folded surfaces of his objects remind us of tree bark as well as classical Greek columns. Mehler’s curvelinear objects bend and turn suggesting energetic impetus as a metaphor for organic growth and vitality.

      Marck

      The video sculptures by Swiss artist MARCK are more than a simple combination of video and sculpture: They are a logic consequence of his extensive examination with films and videos, multimedia based projects, performances, music and sculptural as well as kinetic objects. The examination of humans and their world of feelings is central to MARCK's oeuvre.

Artworks of the exhibition

With works by Marco Casentini, Christiane Grimm, Lucas Blok, Roland Helmer, Marcus Jansen, Moto Waganari, Yoshiyuki Miura, Antonio Marra, Dirk Salz, Slava Seidel, Angela Glajcar, Herbert Mehler, Marck